Archive for November 1st, 2009

01
Nov
09

How Could I Have Missed These???

They must’ve gotten buried in my inbox.  They look pretty darn interesting…

Rethinking the Gospel Sources, Volume 2: The Unity and Plurality of Q
Delbert Burkett

This work examines three disputed issues in the study of Q, the hypothetical source common to the Gospels of Matthew and Luke: its existence; its unity as a document; and the plurality of its wording. It evaluates the arguments for and against the existence of Q and concludes that some form of the Q hypothesis is necessary. It presents new evidence that most of the Q material existed as a single written source unified by recurring features of style and theme. Finally, it argues that differences between Matthew and Luke in the wording of Q were caused most often when one Evangelist replaced or combined Q with parallel material from another source.

Paper $35.95 • 296 pages • ISBN 9781589834125 • Early Christianity and Its Literature 1 • Hardback edition  www.brill.nl

Israel’s Tabernacle as Social Space
Mark K. George

The narratives about Israel’s tabernacle are neither a building blueprint nor simply a Priestly conceit securing priestly prominence in Israel. Using a spatial poetics to reexamine these narratives, George argues that the Priestly writers encode a particular understanding of Israel’s identity and self-understanding in tabernacle space. His examination of Israel’s tabernacle narratives makes space itself the focus of analysis and in so doing reveals the social values, concerns, and ideas that inform these narratives. Through a process of negotiation and exchange with the broader social and cultural world, the Priestly writers portray Israel as having an important role in the divine economy, one that is singularly expressed by this portable structure.

Paper $29.95 • 248 pages • ISBN 9781589831254 • Ancient Israel and Its Literature 2 • Hardback edition  www.brill.nl

The Making of the New Testament Documents
E. Earle Ellis

Do we really know who wrote the New Testament documents? Do we really know when they were written? Scholars have long debated these fundamental questions. This volume identifies and investigates literary traditions and their implications for the authorship and dating of the Gospels and the letters of the New Testament. Departing from past scholarship, E. Earle Ellis argues that the Gospels and the letters are products of the corporate authorship of four allied apostolic missions and not just the creation of individual authors. The analysis of literary traditions also has implications for the dating of New Testament documents. Providing a critique of the current critical orthodoxy with respect to the dating of New Testament documents, Ellis weighs the patristic traditions more heavily and more critically than has been done in the past. Ellis’s new reconstruction of the origin of the New Testament documents provides better answers than have been previously proposed to a number of critical questions. Ellis provides a comprehensive historical reconstruction of the process by which the gospel message became the Gospel books. His arguments, if persuasive, will require a reassessment of the history of early Christianity.

Paper $59.95 • 544 pages • ISBN 9781589834385 • Biblical Interpretation series • Hardback edition www.brill.nl




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